Linguistics and the Teacher

Linguistics and the Teacher is a collection of essays by linguists on different aspects of the relationship between linguistics and education. All the contributors are united in their belief that linguistics should be a central element in the education of teachers, and argue for principled and systematic analysis in the study of the role of language in learning. The essays range from theoretical accounts of the nature of language study in teacher education to practical examples of how linguistics can help the teacher in such diverse contexts as the assessment of difficulty in textbooks, the teaching of literature, and analysing children’s writing.

The book offers models for analysis, specific syllabus and course proposals, and, in a key essay, discussion of those areas relevant to language and learning upon which most linguists would agree. The collection as a whole presents teachers with all the materials they need to make informed judgements about what has hitherto been regarded as a difficult area.


Abraham Lincoln

An enlightening “intellectual biography” of Lincoln, Allen Guelzo’s peerless account of America’s most celebrated president explores the role of ideas in Lincoln’s life, treating him as a serious thinker deeply involved in the nineteenth-century debates over politics, religion, and culture. Written with passion and dramatic impact, Guelzo’s masterful study offers a revealing new perspective on a man whose life was in many ways a paradox.

Since its original publication in 1999, Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President has garnered numerous accolades, not least the prestigious 2000 Lincoln Prize. As journalist Richard N. Ostling has noted, “Much has been written about Lincoln’s belief and disbelief,” but Guelzo’s extraordinary account “goes deeper.”


Sound Approach

A Sound Approach presents a logically sequenced method for teaching reading and spelling using phonemic awareness. The book is based on real classroom experiences, a synthesis of contemporary research, and teacher feedback. This resource provides the knowledge and skills you need to effectively assess and teach crucial reading skills to your beginning and struggling readers.The authors offer:a variety of simple, effective activities that appeal to visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners engaging, easy-to-follow lesson plans appropriate for whole-class, small-group, or individual instruction that easily fit into a readers-workshop or literacy-centre approach enlightening research-to-practice sidebars that respond to common questions and concerns reproducible assessments, sound cards and word cards, short-vowel cue cards, pictures pages, words-and-pictures pages, story starters, and riddles

Ulysses S. Grant

The underappreciated presidency of the military man who won the Civil War and then had to win the peace as well

As a general, Ulysses S. Grant is routinely described in glowing terms-the man who turned the tide of the Civil War, who accepted Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, and who had the stomach to see the war through to final victory. But his presidency is another matter-the most common word used to characterize it is “scandal.” Grant is routinely portrayed as a man out of his depth, whose trusting nature and hands-off management style opened the federal coffers to unprecedented plunder. But that caricature does not do justice to the realities of Grant’s term in office, as Josiah Bunting III shows in this provocative assessment of our eighteenth president.

Grant came to Washington in 1869 to lead a capital and a country still bitterly divided by four years of civil war. His predecessor, Andrew Johnson, had been impeached and nearly driven from office, and the radical Republicans in Congress were intent on imposing harsh conditions on the Southern states before allowing them back into the Union. Grant made it his priority to forge the states into a single nation, and Bunting shows that despite the troubles that characterized Grant’s terms in office, he was able to accomplish this most important task-very often through the skillful use of his own popularity with the American people. Grant was indeed a military man of the highest order, and he was a better president than he is often given credit for.


Biliteracy and Globalization

This book analyzes how the urban disadvantaged in the city of New Delhi learn English. Using qualitative methods the author discusses the pedagogy, texts and contexts in which biliteracy occurs and links English language teaching and learning in India with the broader social and economic processes of globalization in a developing country. The study is situated in a government school, a site where classrooms have rarely been qualitatively described, and where the Three Language Formula (TLF) is being fundamentally transformed due to increasing demand from the community for earlier access to the linguistic capital of English. Through research conducted in a call centre the author also shows what the requirements of new workplaces are and how government schools are trying to meet this demand.